It hurts when I run. That’s what many orthopedic surgeons hear when runners and other athletes come into their offices. Sometimes people have obvious problems, such as strains or sprains. Other times these issues can be tricky to diagnose. The runner you’re about to meet had symptoms he thought were no big deal. But he
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President Donald Trump speaks to journalists in the Brady Press Briefing Room at the White House July 2, 2020. The president addressed reports that the unemployment rate fell to 11.1%. Chip Somodevilla/Getty Images WASHINGTON — The Trump administration has submitted to the UN secretary-general its notice to withdraw from the World Health Organization by July
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 6 2020 Elderly people are more prone to infectious diseases as the function of their immune system continuously declines with progression of age. This becomes especially apparent during seasonal influenza outbreaks or the occurrence of other viral diseases such as COVID-19. As the efficacy of vaccination in the elderly is
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An international research collaboration, including Professor IIJIMA Kazumoto et al. (of the Department of Pediatrics, Kobe University Graduate School of Medicine) has revealed that NPHS1 is a disease-susceptibility gene for steroid-sensitive nephrotic syndrome in children. The NPHS1 gene encodes nephrin, a component protein for the renal glomerulus slit diaphragm, which prevents protein from being passed
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On Nov. 13, 2014, Harvard Medical School officially launched The World Is Waiting: The Campaign for Harvard Medicine, a fundraising campaign that will empower its mission to alleviate human suffering caused by disease through education, discovery, service, and leadership. To learn more about the campaign, go to http://hms.harvard.edu/giving
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 3 2020 Toxic metallic air pollution nanoparticles are getting inside the crucial, energy-producing structures within the hearts of people living in polluted cities, causing cardiac stress – a new study confirms. Using state-of-the-art electron microscopy, scientists are now able to show for the first time that tiny metal nanoparticles are
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 3 2020 Researchers at Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Purdue University and the University of Wisconsin-Madison have isolated human monoclonal antibodies that potentially can prevent a rare but devastating polio-like illness in children linked to a respiratory viral infection. The illness, called acute flaccid myelitis (AFM), causes sudden weakness in the
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You want to be more productive. Iā€™m here to help you do just that. Here are the 5 foundations of productivity that will help you get more done in less time. šŸ’Œ Sign up for my weekly newsletter – https://medschoolinsiders.com/newsletter šŸŒ Website & blog – https://medschoolinsiders.com šŸ“ø Instagram – https://instagram.com/medschoolinsiders šŸ¦ Twitter – https://twitter.com/medinsiders šŸ—£ļø
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People stand in queue to enter a restaurant on Ocean Drive in Miami Beach, Florida on June 26, 2020. Chandan Khanna | AFP | Getty Images Florida on Saturday reported at least 11,445 new coronavirus cases, the state’s largest number of daily cases so far, according to figures released by the Florida Department of Health. 
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A third of people with Parkinson’s have experienced increased symptoms during lockdown, according to a survey by Lancaster University and the charity Parkinson’s UK. The survey asked more than 2,000 people with Parkinson’s and their family members, friends and carers about their experience of lockdown. Responses showed that: more than a third experienced either more
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 2 2020 A new study published recently in “BMC Pediatrics” shows a connection between the time of the month when low-income families receive their Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) benefits and the number of emergency room visits due to injuries to children from those families. Childhood injuries are the leading
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 2 2020 A new research study provides possible explanations for COVID-19 patients who present with extremely low, otherwise life-threatening levels of oxygen, but no signs of dyspnea (difficulty breathing). This new understanding of the condition, known as silent hypoxemia or “happy hypoxia,” could prevent unnecessary intubation and ventilation in patients
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jul 1 2020 A team led by Case Western Reserve University medical researchers has developed a potential treatment method for Pelizaeus-Merzbacher disease (PMD), a fatal neurological disorder that produces severe movement, motor and cognitive dysfunction in children. It results from genetic mutations that prevent the body from properly making myelin, the
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Reviewed by Emily Henderson, B.Sc.Jun 30 2020 New research shows that 47 percent of people are using technology to communicate with their healthcare providers, and less than a quarter are having conversations with their providers about using health information technology (HIT). Regenstrief Institute and Indiana University research scientists say these numbers indicate there are more
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