Month: January 2019

Exposure to Adverse Childhood Experiences (ACEs) is associated with a host of harmful outcomes, including increased risk for cancer. A scoping review was conducted to gain a better understanding of how ACEs have been studied in association with risk factors for cancer. This review includes 155 quantitative, peer-reviewed articles published between 2005 and 2015 that
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Elizabeth A. Van Dyne, MD1,2; Benjamin D. Hallowell, PhD2; Mona Saraiya, MD2; Virginia Senkomago, PhD2; Shivani A. Patel, PhD3; Sutapa Agrawal, PhD4; Arpita Ghosh, PhD4; Deepika Saraf, PhD5; Ravi Mehrotra, MD5; Preet K. Dhillon, PhD4 (View author affiliations) View suggested citation Summary What is already known about this topic? Cervical cancer is the second leading
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Purpose: The prevalence of smoking among cancer survivors is similar to the general population. However, there is little evidence on the prevalence of specific smoking cessation behaviors among adult cancer survivors. Methods: The 2015 National Health Interview Survey (NHIS) data were analyzed to examine the prevalence of smoking cessation behaviors and use of treatments among
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Lung cancer in Spain: information from the Thoracic Tumors Registry (TTR study). Provencio M, Carcereny E, Rodríguez-Abreu D, López-Castro R, Guirado M, Camps C, Bosch-Barrera J, García-Campelo R, Ortega-Granados AL, González-Larriba JL, Casal-Rubio J, Domine M, Massutí B, Sala MÁ, Bernabé R, Oramas J, Del Barco E. Provencio M, et al. Transl Lung Cancer Res.
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You should get your first Pap test at age 21. If your test result is normal, you can wait three years for your next test. If you’re 30 years old or older, you have three options— You can continue getting a Pap test only. If your test result is normal, you can wait three years
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