Acanthosis nigricans  –  Know It All!

Editorial

All you need to know about Acanthosis nigricans.

Know your ailment well, so you can manage it better!!

Here we come with Acanthosis nigricans today!

Acanthosis nigricans 

Overview:

Acanthosis nigricans is also commonly known as Keratosis nigricans.

Acanthosis nigricans in body folds and creases is a skin disease characterized by areas of black, velvety discoloration. The skin affected will thicken. Acanthosis nigricans affects the armpits, groin, and neck most frequently.

In people who are obese or have diabetes, the skin changes of acanthosis nigricans usually happen. There is a greater risk of developing type 2 diabetes in children who inherit the disease. Acanthosis nigricans can rarely be a warning sign of a cancerous tumor in an internal organ such as the liver or stomach.

Specific treatment for acanthosis nigricans is not available. Any of the natural color and texture can be returned to the affected areas of the skin by the treatment of underlying conditions.

Who Gets the Disease:

In both males and females, Acanthosis nigricans is seen. In those who are overweight, have darker skin, and have diabetes or prediabetic conditions, it is most common. Children who develop acanthosis nigricans are at greater risk later in life for developing type 2 diabetes.

The prevalence of acanthosis nigricans differs across racial groups. Persons of African, Caribbean, or Hispanic descent are also at elevated risk, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. When the body mass index ( BMI) is well above average, all ethnic groups are at similarly high risk of acanthosis nigricans.

Causes:

Acanthosis nigricans has been associated with:

  • Insulin resistance. Many individuals that have acanthosis nigricans have also become insulin resistant. Insulin is a pancreas-secreted hormone that helps the sugar to be processed by your body. What ultimately induces type 2 diabetes is insulin resistance.
  • Hormonal disorders. People who have conditions such as ovarian cysts, underactive thyroids, or problems with the adrenal glands also have acanthosis nigricans.
  • Certain drugs and supplements. Acanthosis nigricans can be the cause of high-dose niacin, birth control pills, prednisone, and other corticosteroids.
  • Cancer. Acanthosis nigricans may also occur with lymphoma or when a cancerous tumor, such as the stomach, colon, or liver, starts to develop in an internal organ.

Types:

Acanthosis nigricans 

Risk Factors:

Acanthosis nigricans risk factors include:

  • Obesity. The heavier you are, the higher your risk of acanthosis nigricans.
  • Race. Studies show that in the United States, acanthosis nigricans is more common among Native Americans.
  • Family history. Some types of acanthosis nigricans appear to be hereditary.

Complications:

Usually, absence seizures last from 10 and 15 seconds. After the seizure, the person returns to normal activity. Generally, the person does not recall the past few moments or the seizure itself. Some seizures of absence can last up to 20 seconds.

Although there is a lack of seizures in the brain, they do not cause brain damage. The absence of seizures in most kids would have little effect on intelligence. Because of lapses in consciousness, some kids can experience learning difficulties. Others may believe they are daydreaming or they may not pay attention.

In most cases, whether the person falls or gets killed, the only long-term consequences of a missed seizure arise. Falls aren’t typical during the seizure. An individual may experience seizures of absence a dozen or more times a day without any adverse effects.

Other individuals are typically the first to note seizures of absence. This is because the patient is unaware of a seizure they are experiencing.

Children with seizures of absence often outgrow the condition. Absence seizures, however, will continue. Some patients progress to seizures that are longer or more severe.

The following are common complications:

  • Learning difficulties
  • Behavior problems
  • Social isolation
Acanthosis nigricans 

Symptoms:

The only symptoms of acanthosis nigricans are skin changes. In body folds and creases, usually in your armpits, groin, and back of the neck, you will find heavy, thickened, velvety skin. The changes in the skin usually slowly occur. There may also be an odor or scratch on the infected skin.

Acanthosis nigricans 

Diagnosis: In both males and females, Acanthosis nigricans is seen. In those who are overweight, have darker skin, and have diabetes or prediabetic conditions, it is most common. Children who develop acanthosis nigricans are at greater risk later in life for developing type 2 diabetes.

The prevalence of acanthosis nigricans differs across racial groups. Persons of African, Caribbean, or Hispanic descent are also at elevated risk, according to the American Academy of Dermatology. When the body mass index ( BMI) is well above average, all ethnic groups are at similarly high risk of acanthosis nigricans.

Acanthosis nigricans 

Treatment Options:

Acanthosis nigricans is not a disorder. It’s an indication of another illness that could need medical treatment. Treatment depends to a large degree on treating the illness that triggers it. Your doctor will encourage you to lose weight if you’re overweight. Your doctor can also recommend medicines that help put your blood glucose under control.

Your doctor can make you quit or recommend alternatives if the disorder is triggered by drugs or supplements. When you find the source and get it under control, the discolored skin patches will normally disappear.

In many situations, treating the underlying problem can help fade the discoloration. Examples may include:

  • Losing weight. If your acanthosis nigricans is caused by obesity, losing weight may help.
  • Stopping medications or supplements. If your condition seems to be related to a medication or supplement that you use, your doctor may suggest that you stop using that substance.
  • Having surgery. If acanthosis nigricans was triggered by a cancerous tumor, surgically removing the tumor often clears up the skin discoloration.

If you are concerned about the appearance of your skin or if the lesions become uncomfortable or start to smell bad, your doctor may suggest:

  • Prescription creams to lighten or soften the affected areas
  • Antibacterial soaps, used gently, as scrubbing could worsen the condition
  • Topical antibiotic
  • Oral acne medications
  • Laser therapy to reduce the skin’s thickness

Coping with Acanthosis nigricans:

Acanthosis nigricans, especially if it occurs on the neck or hands, can be highly noticeable and hard to cover up. So doing it for kids can be humiliating. They will feel self-conscious and classmates may tease them.

Doctors also recommend creams and lotions that can help lighten the skin, to help kids feel better about their appearance. In order to understand when and how to implement the treatment plan, ask as many questions as you need to.

Don’t think that the hysteria about bleaches, skin scrubs, and over-the-counter exfoliating treatments is unlikely to work and may irritate the skin, not to mention wasting cash.

You can do a lot as a parent to help your child cope with worry and feel less ashamed. Speak to your child freely about acanthosis nigricans, and let them know he or she is not alone. Ask a doctor about local support groups or other services that can make you feel more positive about your boy.

References:

All Images used are for representation purposes and are obtained from google search and we do not intend to violate copyrights, all credits are due with respective content owners. If you wish to take credit or intend to remove the image, Kindly let us know in the comments.

https://dermnetnz.org/topics/acanthosis-nigricans/

https://www.mayoclinic.org/diseases-conditions/acanthosis-nigricans/diagnosis-treatment/drc-20368987

https://www.healthline.com/health/acanthosis-nigricans#treatment

https://kidshealth.org/Advocate/en/parents/acanthosis.html#

By,

Gopala Krishna Varshith,

Content Developer & Editor,

Clipo.

Articles You May Like

Alcohol Use Disorder  –  Know It All !
Radiation Sickness — Know It All!
Addison’s disease — Know It All!